Texas Cemetery Records Research Guide

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State Cemetery Records

Texas cemetery records will help you fill in gaps in the genealogy or family tree project you are working on. There are different types of vital records you can use aside from Texas cemetery records, but you will find some great data and important details from using these. Because Texas is such a large state with such an extensive history, it has more national cemeteries than many other states. For Definitions of all Cemetery Terms See Symbols on Gravestones and Their Interpretations

The six national cemeteries you may use Texas cemetery records from include:

  • Kerrville National Cemetery
  • Dallas Fort Worth National Cemetery
  • Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery
  • Fort Bliss National Cemetery
  • Houston National Cemetery
  • San Antonio National Cemetery

In addition to these, you may also find Texas cemetery records for other private and public cemeteries in the state. The bottom line is that if your searches have led you to Texas, you are bound to find some data that will be useful.

What You Can Track Down

Texas cemetery records are much more useful than many people realize. You can get much of the same data on Texas cemetery records that you would on other types of vital records. From names, dates and locations to even names of other family members, these records can be very useful. In fact, some people prefer to use Texas cemetery records and tombstone transcriptions because you can often times find records that date back further.

Also, while many standard paper records could be lost or may not have ever been kept very organized to begin with, Texas cemetery records can also be easier to use. Of course, much of this is based on the location and dates you are seeking. You can use this type of valuable data to find important information for ancestry reasons and find it is very helpful in completing your records.

Whether or not you have used cemetery records before does not matter. Even if you would like to use other vital records in addition to these to find what you need, these records should work together. Regardless of how much data you need, you can use Texas cemetery records to help get the job done.

Research In Texas Cemetery Records

Over the years, several Texas cemetery records have been transcribed or collected by various individuals and organizations. The DAR has the largest collection on file. There is also a two-volume collection of entries related to Peters’ Colonists and their descendants available. The FHL and the Texas State Library have copies of the DAR collection available on microfilm.

Several funeral home and cemetery records have been published by genealogical and historical societies in Texas. Researchers can typically purchase copies of those records from those various societies.

Two examples of recently released publications include:

  • Funeral List. 2 vols. Texarkana: Texarkana USA Genealogical Society, 1995–56. Contains 2,047 burials in the Texarkana area with names listed in alphabetical order.
  • Cemeteries of East Texas. Weatherford, Tex.: Parker County Genealogical Society, 1999.

Famous People Buried in Texas Cemeteries

Texas Cemeteries

Texas Cemeteries & Graveyards Links

Further Reading

  • Texas Graveyards: A Cultural Legacy (Austin, Tex.: University of Texas Press, 1984) for a scholarly look at the state’s burying practices over time.
  • The Digger’s Index – Is a three-volume set of cemetery records and is an alphabetical listing of old, abandoned, vandalized or still in use cemeteries.
  • Funeral List. 2 vols. Texarkana: Texarkana USA Genealogical Society, 1995–56. Contains 2,047 burials in the Texarkana area with names listed in alphabetical order.
  • Cemeteries of East Texas. Weatherford, Tex.: Parker County Genealogical Society, 1999.
  • A Reference to Texas Cemetery Records (Humble, Tex.: the author, 1988), arranged by county
  • Texas Cemetery Inscriptions: A Source Index (San Antonio, Tex.: Limited Editions, 1977).