Wyoming Military Records Research Guide

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military recordsThe uses and importance of Wyoming military records in family history research for ancestors who have been veterans are apparent but Wyoming military records can also be essential to researchers whose immediate ancestors were not soldiers in any war. A result of the quantity of genealogical details covered in some Wyoming military pension documents they should not be disregarded throughout the research process.

There were many different military posts located in Wyoming throughout its history. They drew new settlers to the area, among other things. The records held by the Wyoming State Archives relating to those posts are: Fort Bridger, 1858-90, Fort Casper (Old Platte Bridge), 1865-67, Fort Fetterman, 1867-82, Fort Francis E. Warren (Post on Crow Creek; also known as Fort David A. Russell), 1867-1948, Fort Fred Steele, 1868-86, Fort Laramie, 1849-90, Fort McKinney (Cantonment Reno), 1876-94, Camp O. O. Howard, 1885, Fort Philip Kearney (New Fort Reno), 1866-68, Fort Bridge (Fort Davis, Fort Clay), 1855-59, Pilot Butte, 1885-99, Fort Reno (Fort Connor), 1865-68, Fort Sanders (Fort John Buford), 1866-82, Camp Stambaugh, 1870-78, Fort Washakie (Camp Augur, Camp Brown), 1869-1909, Fort Yellowstone (Camp Sheridan), 1886-1918.

It is important to note that the Nebraska Territory military records must be consulted for records pertaining to Civil War servicemen from Wyoming.

The records for Wyoming national Guard members and those who were killed in World War I are all located at the Wyoming State Archives. The FHL and the National Archives each have microfilmed records of Wyoming Draft Registration Cards from 1917 and 1918 for World War I. Selective Service Cars from 1942 through 1946 are located at the Wyoming State Archives.

Records of military discharges can be found at the Wyoming State Archives. However, those records are incomplete because soldiers were not required to submit copies of their discharge records to their county clerk. The extant discharge records are mainly from the early 1900s onward. Researchers must know the county where the discharge papers were filed, in order to find the relevant records, many of which have been indexed.

Some military records can also be found at the State Adjutant General’s Office. That office can be contacted at Adjutant General’s Office, 5500 Bishop Blvd., Cheyenne, WY 82002.

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